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2019 Press Releases

CFYJ’s New Podcast Shares the Voices of Youth Justice

Contact: 
Campaign for Youth Justice
Aprill Turner
Phone: (202) 821-1604 

WASHINGTON (March 18, 2019) -- The Campaign for Youth Justice (CFYJ) is happy to announce our new podcast , “The Voices of Juvenile Justice”, which highlights youth who have been prosecuted or sentenced as adults in the criminal justice system.

CFYJ is a national initiative focused on ending the practice of prosecuting, sentencing, and incarcerating youth under the age of 18 in the adult criminal justice system. In order to assist in our mission of ending youth incarceration, this podcast was created to share information on a different platform. The purpose of this podcast is to share the stories of parents and previously incarcerated youth, as well as to inform listeners on how states are combating youth incarceration through reform.

This podcast will feature various guests with first-hand experience in the adult criminal justice  system, and experts in the field. The podcast will cover a range of subject matter surrounding the criminal justice system and individuals who have been affected by youth incarceration. Topics discussed include: racial disparities within the system, transfers from juvenile facilities to adult courts, lack of early intervention, the effect on parents of incarcerated youth, and solitary confinement.

Letter in Support of Masonique Saunders

Posted in 2019 Press Releases

May 3, 2019

Ron O’Brien, Esq. Franklin County Prosecuting Attorney

373 S. High Street 14th Floor Columbus, OH 43215 This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Re: Request to End the Unjust Prosecution of Masonique Saunders

Dear Prosecuting Attorney O’Brien:

We, the undersigned, write to express our support for Masonique Saunders and our opposition to your office’s decision to file felony murder charges against her.

Columbus Police claim that Masonique was present during an undercover sting operation at which Officer Eric Richards shot and killed sixteen-year-old Julius Ervin Tate Jr. during an alleged robbery. There is an ongoing dispute and investigation regarding whether Julius brandished a firearm at the scene before being shot five times by Officer Richards. What is not in dispute is that Masonique did not commit murder; utilizing the legal fiction of felony murder is a transparent attempt to distract from the actions of Officer Richards in Julius’s death.

Masonique is now seventeen-years-old, an age at which charging her with aggravated robbery and felony murder requires mandatory bindover to adult court under Ohio’s law. Charging Masonique with felony murder and prosecuting her in adult court would create further harm to a community that has already experienced a tragedy with Julius’s death. Research, data, and experience suggest that there are better ways to heal the community while also promoting public safety.

Youth do not belong in the adult criminal justice system. Children in the adult system are more likely to experience physical and sexual abuse, 36 times more likely to commit suicide than their peers held in juvenile facilities, and are more likely to be exposed to prolonged periods of solitary confinement, an experience the United Nations has found is akin to torture. Not only is the experience harmful for youth, but also harmful to public safety. Youth prosecuted in the adult system are at least 34% more likely to recidivate than their peers in the juvenile justice system. Adult prosecution of Masonique serves no public purpose. 3

In this case, Masonique’s alleged actions do not suggest that she is a threat to public safety, and in fact, placing her in the adult system presents a greater risk than it mitigates. Given that Masonique did not shoot Julius Tate Jr., we believe that her court-involvement will not ultimately further public safety. Furthermore, the police actions surrounding the killing of Julius Tate Jr’s and Masonique’s subsequent arrest are deeply concerning and require immediate redress.

We join the Coalition to #FreeMasonique in requesting the following:

  1. The immediate release of Masonique Saunders. 2. Dropping the charges against Masonique. 3. Charge Officer Eric Richards with the murder of Julius Tate Jr. 4. Instigate an independent investigation of the murder of Julius Tate Jr. 5. Release the documents in the records release request filed by the Tate family.

We hope that you will strongly consider dropping the charges against Masonique and moving forward with the request above in order to heal the harm and trauma to the community caused by the death of Julius Tate. If you have any questions regarding the content of this letter, please contact Jeree Thomas at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

Sincerely,

Jeree Thomas, Policy Director Campaign for Youth Justice

Jason Szanyi, Deputy Director Center for Children’s Law & Policy

Gina Womack, Executive Director Families and Friends of Louisiana’s Incarcerated Children

Grace Bauer, Executive Director Justice for Families

Cayla Burton, Policy Director Juvenile Justice Coalition, OH

3 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.(2007) Effects on Violence of Laws and Policies Facilitating the Transfer of Youth from the Juvenile to the Adult Justice System: Report on Recommendations of the Task Force on Community Preventive Services, Retrieved from http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/rr5609a1.htm.

Riya Shah, Managing Director Juvenile Law Center

Michael Friedman, Executive Director Legal Rights Center, MN

Rachel Gassert, Policy Director Louisiana Center for Children’s Rights

Sarah Bryer, Executive Director National Juvenile Justice Network

Kathy Wright, Executive Director New Jersey Parents’ Caucus

Valerie Slater, Executive Director RISE for Youth

1 Arya, N. (2018). Getting to Zero: A 50-State Study of Strategies to Remove Youth from Adult Jails. Los Angeles, CA: UCLA School of Law (2018). Retrieved from https://drive.google.com/file/d/1LLSF8uBlrcqDaFW3ZKo_k3xpk_DTmItV/view 2 U.N. Secretary General, Torture and Other Cruel, Inhuman, or Degrading Treatment or Punishment, ¶ 77, U.N. Doc. A/66/268 (Aug. 5, 2011), Retrieved from http://solitaryconfinement.org/uploads/ SpecRapTortureAug2011.pdf.

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About the Campaign for Youth Justice:
The Campaign for Youth Justice, based in Washington, DC, is dedicated to ending the practice of trying, sentencing, and incarcerating youth under 18 in the adult criminal justice system.

National Coalition Releases Recommendations to 116th Congress for Juvenile Justice & Delinquency Prevention

Posted in 2019 Press Releases

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:
February 26, 2019 

Contact:
Campaign for Youth Justice
Aprill Turner
Phone: (202) 821-1604 Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Coalition for Juvenile Justice

Naomi Smoot
Phone: (202) 467-0864 ext.113; Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

National Coalition Releases Recommendations to 116th Congress for Juvenile Justice & Delinquency Prevention

WASHINGTON, D.C. – The National Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Coalition (NJJDPC) held a Congressional briefing today to discuss the latest on federal juvenile justice reform, including what is next in the wake of the reauthorization of the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act (JJDPA), and other key priorities for the 116th Congress. Congressman Tony Cárdenas gave opening remarks, and Anahi Figueroas-Martinez, a member of Juveniles for Justice, a project of the Juvenile Law Center, and Shamelen Henderson, a member of the D.C. Department of Youth Rehabilitative Services Youth Council, shared their experiences with the juvenile justice system with Congressional staff.

NJJDPC also released their recommendations for the 116th Congress. “Last year showed great progress in the advancement of juvenile justice reforms. We are pleased to provide these recommendations to Congress on ways they can continue to build on the successes of last Congress,” says Rachel Marshall, Federal Policy Counsel at the Campaign for Youth Justice. The recommendations highlight six areas where Congress can take action to promote safe communities, ensure the welfare of our children, and guarantee a fair and equitable justice system, including: 1) Establishing a positive vision for juvenile justice reform; 2) ensuring developmentally appropriate responses to justice-involved youth; 3) reducing reliance on detention and incarceration and investing in communities; 4) ensuring fairness and equity for justice-involved youth; 5) ensuring safety for justice-involved youth; and 6) helping youth successfully reenter their communities.

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About NJJDPC: The National Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Coalition (NJJDPC) is a collaborative array of youth- and family- serving, social justice, law enforcement, corrections, and faith-based organizations, working to ensure healthy families, build strong communities and improve public safety by promoting fair and effective policies, practices and programs for youth involved or at risk of becoming involved in the juvenile and criminal justice systems.

New Brief Highlights Disproportionality in the Waiver of Black Children to New Jersey’s Adult Criminal Justice System

Posted in 2019 Press Releases

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Press Contacts:
Kathy Wright
Executive Director
New Jersey Parents’ Caucus
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.  

Aprill Turner
Communication Director
Campaign for Youth Justice
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

New Brief Highlights Disproportionality in the Waiver of Black Children to New Jersey’s Adult Criminal Justice System

Elizabeth, New Jersey (May 22, 2019) -  Souls of Young Folk: The Disproportionate Prosecution of Black Youth as Adult in New Jersey, a new brief by the New Jersey Parents’ Caucus (NJPC), highlights the historical and social treatment of black youth in New Jersey and the emergence of the state’s youth waiver laws.  

In 1990, 281 youth were referred to criminal court.  After the creation of additional waiver statutes the number rose to 564 referrals to criminal court despite the number of youth arrests for serious offenses declining by over forty percent from 1990.  

Since the passage of S. 2003, New Jersey’s 2015 juvenile justice reform bill, fewer youth have been waived to adult court. According to data from New Jersey’s Uniform Crime Reporting System, 161 youth were waived in 2016 compared to 195, the year before the law passed.  

However, despite these significant reductions,  racial disproportionality continues to persist. While black youth make up approximately fourteen percent of the youth population, they represent sixty-six percent of the youth waived to adult court in New Jersey. NJPC’s Executive Director, Kathy Wright, explains that the report is long overdue and highlights a critical area for youth justice reform:

“We cannot talk about reform without talking about the historical context of disproportionality and how that context is the foundation of our current waiver laws that perpetuate disproportionality despite significant reductions in youth arrests. S. 2003 provided a springboard for New Jersey to continue to push for significant reforms, but there is still so much that is not publicly available on outcomes for youth who have been waived to adult court.  We need that data to make informed decisions about how to reduce disparities, hold system stakeholders accountable, end the solitary confinement of youth In the criminal justice system and most importantly get youth appropriate services outside of the justice system. Services that they can’t get in the adult system.”

NJPC recommends that the state publishes more detailed data on waiver by race, that the Juvenile Justice Commission develops a plan to reduce disproportionality in waiver, and that prosecutors are held accountable for their decision to motion to waive youth.  NJPC also encourages the legislature to study the effectiveness of its recent racial impact statement law and consider making changes if it is not helping to address disparities and disproportionality. While Director Kathy Wright believes that the only way to eliminate disparities and disproportionality is to end waiver in New Jersey, she acknowledges that it will take time to get there.  =

“The disproportionality that we see in our system did not happen overnight and it won’t end overnight, but we must act with urgency to dismantle this approach and the first step is acknowledging the many factors and biases that tend to push children of color to the adult system.”

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About the New Jersey Parents’ Caucus
The New Jersey Parents’ Caucus Inc. is a coalition of parents, caregivers and youth whose mission is to ensure that every family who has children with special emotional and behavioral needs is given an opportunity to play a strong and active role in the conceptualization, development and delivery of effective and timely services in the mental health, juvenile justice, child welfare and special education systems. To download a copy of the report, please email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. of visit http://newjerseyparentscaucus.org/.

New Brief Highlights State Efforts to Remove Youth from Adult Jails

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Press Contact:

Aprill Turner
Communication Director
Campaign for Youth Justice
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

New Brief Highlights State Efforts to Remove Youth from Adult Jails

Washington, D.C. (June 20, 2019) -  “Removing Youth from Adult Jails: A 50-State Scan of Pretrial Detention Laws for Youth Transferred to the Adult System,” a new brief by the Campaign for Youth Justice (CFYJ), highlights state readiness to remove children under age 18 from adult jails.

The brief was released in response to the passage of the Juvenile Justice Reform Act of 2018 (JJRA), signed into law on December 21, 2018. The JJRA reauthorized the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act (JJDPA) for the first time in sixteen years and, in addition to many other important reforms, the law will now require states to remove all youth, including those transferred to the adult system, from adult jails and lock-ups pretrial.

A scan of all 50 states revealed that many states have moved quicker than the federal government in calling for the removal of youth with adult charges from jails; with 70% of youth charged as adults already housed in youth facilities. The vast majority of states permit or require youth charged as adults to be held in juvenile facilities pre-trial, including states like Kentucky, New Mexico, and Ohio. Yet, with 1 in 10 youth still being housed in adult facilities pre-trial, the brief underscores the urgency of responding to these youth in a more age-appropriate manner. Unlike juvenile detention facilities, adult jails are not designed with a focus on rehabilitation, and staff receive little or no training on the social, emotional, or psychological needs of children, nor do they provide adjustments to physical techniques used to control older inmates.

The new brief includes excerpts from interviews conducted by CFYJ of young people who were transferred to the adult system and are currently detained in juvenile facilities. “While research has shown us just how harmful it is to house youth in adult facilities, our conversations with young people who were first housed in adult jails before being moved to juvenile facilities is very eye-opening,” said CFYJ Federal Policy Counsel Rachel Marshall. “The young people we spoke to emphasized the different approaches from staff and access to programming and education while in the youth facilities. They talked about being maced and locked-down in adult jails, but used words like “care” and “love” when describing staff in youth facilities.”

The report calls on states to take a multi-step approach to removing youth from adult jails and lock-ups, including:

  • Updating state statutes to prohibit the detention of youth in adult jails and lock-ups;
  • Urging members of Congress to fully fund the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act so that states have the assistance of federal dollars to make necessary changes to remove youth from adult jails and lock-ups;
  • Raising the age of criminal responsibility; and
  • Limiting the pathways of transfer into the adult system.

Download the full report here.

View the statutes of all 50 states here.

New Report From the Campaign For Youth Justice Highlights Alternatives to Adult Incarceration

Posted in 2019 Press Releases

CONTACT:
Aprill O. Turner
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
(202) 779-2910 (M)

WASHINGTON (April 17, 2019) -- In an effort to identify alternatives to adult incarceration for youth, the Campaign for Youth Justice (CFYJ) is learning from stakeholders across the country about their efforts to serve youth charged as adults across a continuum of care. In a new report, “If Not The Adult System,Then Where? Alternatives to Adult Incarceration For Youth Certified Adults”. CFYJ shares current and emerging practices for better serving youth charged as adults, insights from practitioners about what makes for successful programming for this population, and specific recommendations for policy and practice change.

“Failed and damaging policies that treat children as adults have always existed in the US and have deep historical roots in racist ideology.  The massive expansion of transfer laws thirty years ago trapped hundreds of thousands of youth between two systems — too often rendering them invisible and forgotten,” said Marcy Mistrett, CEO of the Campaign for Youth Justice. “Communities and states are now using research and data to bring many youth back to a more developmentally appropriate system of care. It's been affirming to talk to so many community and system leaders that now say, ‘These are our children. They belong with us here.’”

Speaking with stakeholders across the country that serve youth charged as adults across a continuum of care, CFYJ found a variety of approaches that are effective in ensuring youth are responded to in an appropriate way. These approaches include:

  • Narrowing state laws for how and when youth are sent to the adult system;
  • Investing in non-residential, community-based initiatives that offer diversion opportunities to more youth, including those charged with felonies;
  • Deploying community-based therapeutic interventions well into adolescence that are more developmentally appropriate and that may include residential treatment; and
  • Allowing youth charged and sentenced as adults to remain under juvenile justice custody and offering appropriate services to them.

Over the past two decades, recognizing that youth incarceration is overused, expensive, and ineffective at reducing recidivism and preparing youth for re-entry, the youth justice system has shifted from large youth prisons to investments in community- based alternatives to detention and smaller secure placements. Many youth justice systems also have begun relying on tenets of adolescent development, building developmentally appropriate continuums of care and ensuring that responses to youth criminal behavior have been individualized.

However, since the 1990s, tens of thousands of youth have been prosecuted as adults each year and completely excluded from juvenile court jurisdiction, therefore not benefitting from these advancements. The majority of youth charged as adults have entered the adult system without a juvenile court reviewing their case or assessing their risks and needs.

However, there has been some progress. Over the past 13 years, at least 37 states and the District of Columbia have passed laws to keep more youth in the juvenile justice system. As a result, the number of youth charged as adults in adult facilities has decreased more than 60% nationally; down from 10,000 youth per night in 2000 to 4,200 in 2016.

The report calls on states and localities to do more to invest in what is working and to include youth charged as adults in their services and programs. Too many youth aged 17 or younger are still classified as adults, and too many children still sleep in adult facilities every night. Overwhelmingly, they are African American, Latino, and Tribal youth, with 2016 showing the largest racial disproportionality in thirty years. Too many youth, seen as less innocent and more deserving of punishment, still face extreme sentences and inhumane treatment in a system designed to incapacitate adults.  The report lists recommendations to build on effective practice and invest in strategies that will help youth and communities heal while keeping communities safe.

Download the full report here.
View the interactive report here.

About the Campaign for Youth Justice:
The Campaign for Youth Justice (CFYJ) is a national initiative focused entirely on ending the practice of prosecuting, sentencing, and incarcerating youth under the age of 18 in the adult criminal justice system. CFYJ was initiated in 2004 by a parent whose son was transferred to the adult criminal court for prosecution

President Trump Releases Fiscal Year 2020 Budget Proposal

Contact:
Campaign for Youth Justice
Aprill Turner
Phone: (202) 821-1604 

Coalition for Juvenile Justice
Naomi Smoot
Phone: (202) 467-0864 ext.113

President Trump Releases Fiscal Year 2020 Budget Proposal Budget proposal undermines reauthorization bill signed by President Trump in 2018

WASHINGTON, D.C. (March 13, 2019) –The Act 4 JJ Coalition is deeply disappointed in President Trump’s FY 2020 budget proposal. His plan includes $238.5 million for juvenile justice programs, down from the $287 million appropriated in FY 2019. This 17% decrease comes as a surprise after President Trump signed the Juvenile Justice Reform Act of 2018, which reauthorizes the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act (JJDPA).

According to documents provided by the Department of Justice at the annual budget rollout on March 12, 2019, the administration has requested $58 million for Title II of the JJDPA and $17 million for Title V. This is more than $100 million below what Congress authorized in December’s bill passage, which set these levels at $176 million per year for the next five years. The President’s budget proposal, dubbed “A Budget for a Better America,” notes that lower-level priority programs at the Department of Justice have been reduced or eliminated.

“Our country cannot afford to continue to view our children and youth as low-level priorities,” said Naomi Smoot, Executive Director of the Coalition for Juvenile Justice and co-chair of the Act 4 JJ Coalition. “The reauthorization signed by the President in December of last year made critical improvements to the JJDPA to ensure states can protect children and youth in the juvenile and criminal justice systems, while improving community safety. Successful implementation requires full funding as authorized by Congress.”

The JJDPA creates a critical Federal/state partnership that has worked to reduce our over-reliance on youth incarceration and resulted in lowest youth crime rates in four decades. When President Trump signed the Juvenile Justice Reform Act of 2018, it marked the first time in 16 years that this keystone federal program was reauthorized. “This proposed cut is an affront to our children and families,” said Marcy Mistrett, CEO of the Campaign for Youth Justice and co-chair for the Act 4 JJ Coalition, “and it undermines the promise made by Attorney General Barr during his confirmation process that he would ensure the effective implementation of the Juvenile Justice Reform Act of 2018.”

The cuts proposed to juvenile justice programs are part of a larger, concerning trend in the proposed budget to cut programs that support some of our nation’s most vulnerable children. The administration is seeking one of the largest-ever cuts to domestic discretionary spending and drastic cuts to mandatory spending programs, including the Children’s Health Insurance Program, the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), and Medicaid.

For more information go to www.ACT4JJ.org

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About Act 4 Juvenile Justice - Act 4 Juvenile Justice (ACT 4 JJ) is a campaign of the National Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Coalition (NJJDPC), which represents a broad network of organizations that work on youth development and juvenile justice issues. ACT 4 JJ is composed of juvenile justice, child welfare, and youth development organizations advocating for the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act (JJDPA) and increased federal funding for juvenile justice programs and services.

The Act 4 JJ Coalition Honors the Legacy of Senator Birch Bayh

Posted in 2019 Press Releases

Contact:
Campaign for Youth Justice
Aprill Turner
Phone: (202) 821-1604 

Coalition for Juvenile Justice
Naomi Smoot
Phone: (202) 467-0864 ext.113

The Act 4 JJ Coalition Honors the Legacy of Senator Birch Bayh 
Architect of the cornerstone juvenile justice reform legislation passes away at the age of 91

WASHINGTON, D.C (March 14, 2019). – Civil rights champion and architect of the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act (JJDPA), former Senator Birch Bayh of Indiana passed away today at the age of 91. While perhaps more well known for authoring Title IX, the 1964 Civil Rights Act, and two constitutional amendments, Bayh was also a long-time champion for juvenile justice reform. As Chair of the Senate Judiciary Subcommittee on Juvenile Delinquency, Bayh held a hearing in 1971 detailing the rampant abuse in the youth prison system. He that incarcerated youth were often “beaten, brutalized and subject[ed] to vicious sexual attacks.” After Senator Bayh initially introduced the JJDPA in 1972, the legislation was finally signed into law by President Gerald Ford in 1974.

“The introduction and eventual passage of the JJDPA marked the first time we had a concrete response from the Federal government to address the way states treat young people in their custody,” said Marcy Mistrett, CEO of the Campaign for Youth Justice and co-chair for the Act 4 JJ Coalition. “Thanks to Senator Bayh’s relentless advocacy, Congress took action to protect some our country’s most vulnerable children. The JJDPA has been so successful that nearly every state and U.S. territory participate in this voluntary program, and youth crime is at all all-time low.”

The Senator’s passing comes shortly after the JJDPA was finally reauthorized after a 16-year lapse. In December 2018, Congress passed a reauthorization bill that strengthened the core protections and included critical, research-based improvements that reaffirm a national commitment to the rehabilitative purpose of the juvenile justice system. States and advocates now await direction from the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention on the implementation of these important updates. “The passing of the first champion for juvenile justice reform cannot be the death of the law. We need to honor the legacy of Senator Bayh by ensuring full implementation of the reforms made by the Juvenile Justice Reform Act of 2018,” said Naomi Smoot, Executive Director of the Coalition for Juvenile Justice and co-chair of the Act 4 JJ Coalition.

The Act 4 JJ Coalition honors the life of Senator Bayh. We remain committed to carrying on the work started by the Senator and honor his legacy through continued advocacy for our nation’s young people.

For more information go to www.ACT4JJ.org

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About Act 4 Juvenile Justice - Act 4 Juvenile Justice (ACT 4 JJ) is a campaign of the National Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Coalition (NJJDPC), which represents a broad network of organizations that work on youth development and juvenile justice issues. ACT 4 JJ is composed of juvenile justice, child welfare, and youth development organizations advocating for the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act (JJDPA) and increased federal funding for juvenile justice programs and services.

The Michigan Senate Has Voted to Raise The Age

Posted in 2019 Press Releases

New Legislation Would Improve Public Safety and Result in Better Outcomes for Vulnerable Young People

WASHINGTON (April 24, 2019) - The Michigan Senate has voted to increase the age at which youth are automatically tried as adults from 17 to 18. Should the legislation pass the House of Representatives and be signed into law by the Governor, Michigan would become the sixth state in the last four years to enact such legislation.

Michigan is one of just four states that has yet to update its laws that require all 17-year-olds to be tried in adult courts. Currently in Michigan, children are automatically charged as adults the day they turn 17, even for the most minor offenses, but plans to “Raise the Age” in the state have been in the works for several years.

“This legislation has been carefully considered and diligently pursued, and we are so happy to now see Michigan moving to Raise the Age." said Marcy Mistrett, CEO at the Campaign for Youth Justice. "As we have seen in other states that have made this change, this legislation will lead to better outcomes for children, who will be protected from the harms of the adult criminal justice system, and for public safety, as children who remain in the juvenile justice system have significantly lower rates of recidivism than those who are tried and punished as adults."

“As we have seen in other states, we anticipate that the short-term costs of this reform will be much less than anticipated, while the long-term benefits to the Michigan economy will be significant,” Mistrett added.

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About the Campaign for Youth Justice:
The Campaign for Youth Justice, based in Washington, DC, is dedicated to ending the practice of trying, sentencing, and incarcerating youth under 18 in the adult criminal justice system.

Press Releases Archive