logobyline

cfyj donate   twitter   facebook   podcast   amazon smile    instagramlogo

2020 Press Releases

FY 2020 Consolidated Appropriations Act Expected to Be Signed into Law

Posted in 2020 Press Releases

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:
December 20, 2019

Contact:
Campaign for Youth Justice
Aprill  O. Turner
Phone: (202) 821-1604
Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Coalition for Juvenile Justice
Naomi Smoot
Phone: (202) 467-0864 ext.113;
Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

FY 2020 Consolidated Appropriations Act Expected to Be Signed into Law

 Fiscal Year 2020 brings another funding increase to juvenile justice programs, just one day before the anniversary of the reauthorization of the JJDPA.

WASHINGTON, D.C. – Today, President Donald Trump is expected to sign into law H.R. 1865, the $1.4 trillion FY 2020 omnibus appropriations bill. The bill includes small increases in spending for key provisions of the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act (JJDPA), marking the third consecutive year of increases in funding levels. The bill was signed just one day before the one-year anniversary of the historic reauthorization of this critical Act.

The omnibus provides $63 million for Title II of the Act, up from $60 million in FY 2019. Title II supports innovative state efforts to adhere to standards that reduce the risk of harm to court-involved youth, ensure fair treatment of minority youth, improve the way systems address delinquent behavior, and ensure citizen involvement and expertise through the State Advisory Groups. The omnibus also provides $42 million for Title V of the Act, which is one of the only federal programs specifically designed to prevent delinquency at the local level. This marks a drastic increase from FY 2019, when Title V programs only received $27.5 million in funding. 

In addition to the increase in funding levels for Title V, this is also the first year since FY 2016 that Congress has not completely earmarked all of the funding provided under Title V. The reauthorization of the law significantly expanded the types of delinquency prevention programs that qualify for funding under Title V, allowing for a broader, more holistic approach to addressing the needs of youth who have been in contact with the justice system and preventing delinquency. However, earmarking the funding limits how those dollars can be used. This year, $14.5 million of the overall $42 million will remain open for states and localities to use on the more than twenty categories of programming defined under the Incentive Grants for Prison Reduction through Opportunities, Mentoring, Intervention, Support, and Education (Youth PROMISE grants).

While this year’s funding bill does represent yet another year of increases for funding of juvenile justice programs, the omnibus does fall short of the funding amounts provided for in the Juvenile Justice Reform Act of 2018, which reauthorized the JJDPA for the first time in sixteen years. The bill authorizes a total of $176 million every year for fiscal years 2019-2023 for the Department of Justice to operate programs under the Act. 

“While we hoped to see the JJDPA funded at authorizing levels for the first full year of the reauthorized Act, we are glad to see the continuing upward trend of investment in juvenile justice programs. Increased investment in these programs is critical to ensuring our kids and communities are safe," says Rachel Marshall, Federal Policy Counsel for the Campaign for Youth Justice and Co-chair of the Act4JJ Campaign.  

As we mark the one-year anniversary of the passage of the Juvenile Justice Reform Act of 2018, we look forward to continuing to work with Congress to ensure these important programs are fully funded. 

For more information go to www.ACT4JJ.org

###

About Act 4 Juvenile Justice - Act 4 Juvenile Justice (ACT4JJ) is a campaign of the National Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Coalition (NJJDPC), which represents over 80 national organizations who work on youth development and juvenile justice issues. ACT4JJ is composed of juvenile justice, child welfare and youth development organizations advocating for the reauthorization of the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act (JJDPA) and increased federal funding for juvenile justice programs and services.

National Advocates Call On Congress and the Administration to Pass an Additional Stimulus Bill that Addresses Needs of Children and Young People Who are Currently Trapped in Overcrowded Jails and Detention Centers

Posted in 2020 Press Releases

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:
March 26, 2020
 
Contact:
Campaign for Youth Justice
Aprill  O. Turner
Phone: (202) 821-1604
Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
 
Coalition for Juvenile Justice
Naomi Smoot Evans
Phone: (202) 467-0864 ext.113
Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
 
Washington, D.C. (March 26, 2020) National youth justice advocates and stakeholders were disheartened today to see that some of our most vulnerable youth are once again being overlooked by the federal government. 
 
Today’s stimulus legislation, which is meant to help address America’s needs during the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, does little to help young people who are in secure custody or for those who are at risk of coming into contact with the justice system. 
 
We call on Congress and the Administration to pass an additional stimulus bill that addresses the needs of children and young people who are currently trapped in overcrowded jails and detention centers where social distancing simply is not possible. We owe it to our children to ensure that they have access to basic necessities: communication with their family through free phone calls or teleconferencing; access to remote-based educational opportunities; and access to life saving medical care and testing. States and localites also need access to preventive care for the majority of youth who are served in the community. 
 
These services are costly and we were pleased to see $100 million in additional juvenile justice funding including in the House’s version of the bill. 
 
“Federal juvenile justice programs have long been underfunded and additional money is essential to helping ensure that states can provide basic services and emergency responses to protect our young people during these trying times,” said Naomi Smoot Evans, Executive Director of the Coalition for Juvenile Justice and Co-Chair of the Act4JJ Coalition. 
 
We continue to urge courts and communities to let young people come home. We were pleased to see provisions in the CARES Act that would enable courts to hold most hearings remotely, with the exception of contested transfer hearings and adjudications. This will ensure that young people do not have to remain in detention unnecessarily and that their Due Process rights are not impinged as a result of this crisis. 
 
We are concerned, however, that detention hearings are included on the list of proceedings that can take place remotely. This allows for protection and safe social distancing for all parties involved in the case, except for the young person. We need to protect our young people as well.
 
“We are happy that many states aren’t waiting for the federal government to act on behalf of children, and are developing emergency plans, increasing frequency of calls to families, and are beginning to work on getting children home,” said Marcy Mistrett, CEO of the Campaign for Youth Justice and Co-Chair of the Act 4 JJ Campaign, “but the federal government has an essential role in assisting states to keep children and staff safe, including those in secure settings; this needs to be a top priority in April.” 

Press Releases Archive