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Juvenile Justice News

Stop Solitary for Kids

Every day in the United States, some 54,000 young people are incarcerated in the juvenile justice system. Many experience the harsh realities of solitary confinement during their imprisonment, often for minor rule violations. Research and experience reveal the impact of solitary on young people to be devastating, including trauma, psychological damage, depression, anxiety, and increased risk of suicide. Often, youth in solitary do not receive appropriate education, mental health services, or drug treatment. Because adolescents are still developing, solitary confinement can cause permanent harm to their physical, psychological, and social well-being. More than half of all suicides in juvenile facilities occur while young people are held in solitary. Many youth literally go mad in such conditions. 

Study Finds 'Significant' Increase in State Juvenile Justice Reform

At least 36 states have passed legislation to keep young people out of adult prisons or jails since 2005—and more states are on track to limit youth exposure to the adult justice system over the next two years, according to a study released Wednesday.

Study: Juveniles more likely to re-offend if mother doesn't understand legal process

Juvenile first-time offenders whose mothers don't get involved in their legal proceedings are much more likely to commit another crime, according to a new study. The study from Michigan State University looked at the cases of more than 300 male juvenile first-time offenders aged 13 to 17. Since juvenile offenders often don't have a present father in their lives, researchers chose to focus on offenders with female primary guardians.

Study: LGBT Youth are Disproportionately in Jail

A disproportionate number of queer youth, particular lesbians and bisexual girls, end up in jail or prison in the United States, according to a study released today by researchers at UCLA. Worse, those youth are considerably more likely to be raped during their time in custody.

Take Care of Our Youth

According to the Sentencing Project, the United States is the world’s leader in incarceration with 2.2 million people currently in prison or jail. Prison overcrowding is a significant problem, and results in youth being assigned to adult prisons and jails to serve their sentences. North Carolina, Connecticut and New York are just some states that are addressing this issue.

TENNESSEE: Criminal justice reform advocates troubled about juvenile court reports

Criminal justice reform advocates responded with concern Thursday following reports that detention at Juvenile Court of Memphis and Shelby County became more dangerous after Shelby County Sheriff Bill Oldham took over detention operations on July 1.
Reports released Wednesday showed an increase in suicidal behavior, use of force, assaults on youth by each other and staff reporting they fear for their safety.

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Texas, Missouri Debate Next Step on Raise the Age

Brett Merfish had a list of reasons why Texas should raise the age of criminal responsibility to 18. She pointed to research showing that states that had already adopted the practice saw crime and recidivism reduced and better outcomes for the juveniles and their families.

TEXAS: Harris County faces space issues to protect teen inmates

Harris County has had problems complying with a law meant to protect youthful offenders and reduce sexual assaults in jail. The Houston Chronicle (http://bit.ly/29qPAVn) reported Tuesday that 17-year-olds at the county jail in Houston, when prosecuted as adults, have no place to go while awaiting trial.

TEXAS: The Texas Way on Juvenile Justice (New York Times)

Texas has made huge strides in reforming its once hellish juvenile justice system. Young offenders in state facilities were once subjected to brutality, neglect and sexual abuse. But after revelations of those conditions led to a public outcry in 2007, elected officials moved quickly to make sure that troubled young people were more likely to find the services they needed - and to keep as many young people as possible from entering state facilities in the first place. As important, the state now has the data to prove that it has made progress and to point to where it might make more. 

The 14-Year-Old Who Grew Up in Prison

No crime story fulfills our need for justice without a corresponding punishment. That's how wrongs are righted in our moral imaginations. But if the crime and punishment aren't balanced, we're left waiting for an equilibrium that never comes. This is one of those stories.

The Battle Against Prisons for Kids

 For as long as youth prisons have existed in the United States, so too has the pretense that there are no youth prisons. Early 19th century reformers who sought to remove children from the harsh adult penal system established new institutions specifically for the detention of youths. They didn’t call them prisons, but Houses of Refuge, dedicated to the discipline and reform of newly coined group, “juvenile delinquents.” Founded with ostensibly laudable intent, the institutions were overcrowded fortresses, riddled with abuse, serving to institutionalize strict social control over poor and immigrant communities. That is, they were prisons.

The Curse of Custody: Enduring Incarceration

Karma arrives abruptly when locked in a court school classroom. Not the usual lock-in. No way out. Twenty students. Twenty pencils. Twenty hearts with rage. No available intervention for a scuffle. 

The impact of silence: The incarceration of children who have committed no crime

=Congress has recessed for the summer without passing any justice reform—not in the criminal nor juvenile justice arenas.  Neither the Sentencing & Corrections Reform Act (SCRA), nor the Juvenile Justice & Delinquency Prevention Act (JJDPA)—both bills with bipartisan support—were able to be passed into law before the long summer recess. 

The Justice System Continues to Fail Black Boys

As we begin another Black History Month, it is time to celebrate the contributions and history of African Americans in this country.  Along with the celebration of progress, it’s also a time to reflect on areas for improvement. How young Black boys are treated in the criminal justice system is one of those areas. 

The Justice System Continues to Fail Black Boys

As we begin another Black History Month, it is time to celebrate the contributions and history of African Americans in this country. Along with the celebration of progress, it’s also a time to reflect on areas for improvement. How young black boys are treated in the criminal justice system is one of those areas. 

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