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Juvenile Justice Reform

Guiding Principles for Providing High-Quality Education in Juvenile Justice Secure Care Settings

This report focuses on five guiding principles recommended by the federal government for providing high-quality education in juvenile justice secure care settings:

- A safe, healthy facility-wide climate that prioritizes education, provides the conditions for learning, and encourages the necessary behavioral and social support services that address the individual needs of all youths, including those with disabilities and English learners.

- Necessary funding to support educational opportunities for all youths within long-term secure care facilities

- Recruitment, employment, and retention of qualified education staff with skills relevant in juvenile justice settings who can positively impact long-term student outcomes

- Rigorous and relevant curricula aligned with state academic and career and technical education standards that utilize instructional methods, tools, materials, and practices that promote college- and career-readiness

- Formal processes and procedures – through statutes, memoranda of understanding, and practices – that ensure successful navigation across child-serving systems and smooth reentry into communities.

Health Coverage and Care for Youth in the Juvenile Justice System: The Role of Medicaid and CHIP

This brief provides an overview of the health and mental health needs of girls and boys in the juvenile justice system and the role of Medicaid in addressing those needs. It focuses on the circumstances of those girls and boys who are placed in juvenile justice residential facilities, the discontinuity of Medicaid coverage for those youth, and the options for improving coverage, continuity of care and access to needed services post-discharge, including new opportunities provided by the Affordable Care Act.

Juvenile Justice in a Developmental Framework: A 2015 Status Report

This report defines developmentally appropriate best practices in nine key juvenile justice policy areas and examines which states (and the District of Columbia) have, as of mid-2015, incorporated those practices into their juvenile justice statutes. The policy areas are status offense rules, age limits for juvenile court jurisdiction, transfer to adult court, access to counsel, competency to stand trial, courtroom shackling, solitary confinement, juvenile records, and sex offender registration.

Juvenile Justice Reform: County Leadership Roles and Opportunities

This report details why it is important to improve juvenile justice systems and how county governments can lead improvement efforts in their role as primary local providers of health, justice and social services for communities. Recognizing that many juvenile justice systems have inappropriate, cost-ineffective or nonexistent programs to assist youth who end up in courts and detention centers for nonviolent crimes, the report provides guidance to county officials and staff on community-based alternatives that are proven to produce better outcomes and cost less.

Juvenile Justice Reform: County Leadership Roles and Opportunities

This report details why it is important to improve juvenile justice systems and how county governments can lead improvement efforts in their role as primary local providers of health, justice and social services for communities. Recognizing that many juvenile justice systems have inappropriate, cost-ineffective or nonexistent programs to assist youth who end up in courts and detention centers for nonviolent crimes, the report provides guidance to county officials and staff on community-based alternatives that are proven to produce better outcomes and cost less.

Juvenile Offenders and Victims: 2014 National Report | Fourth Edition

This report pinpoints on national data collections that exemplify the specific information needs of those involved with the juvenile justice system. Chapter 7 focuses on youth in adult facilities.

Mending Justice: Sentinel Event Review

This research sheds light of how criminal justice systems should respond to errors. This series of articles focuses on sentinel event errors that could cause a change of reactions and threaten the integrity of the system as a whole.

The State of Juvenile Justice

This article discusses reforming the juvenile justice system in response to children and young people who have been victimized from non-criminal behavior. It exemplifies the misconstruing of having something "beyond control" and emphasizes on the fact that if someone does not act no one will, but in fact that if someone does act, no one else will because the burden is placed elsewhere. Reforms for replenishing these ideas are in much need not just currently but for your justice system and those affected by it.