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2018

Major Updates on State-Level Legislation

Brian Evans Thursday, 25 January 2018 Posted in 2018, CFYJ Updates

By Brian Evans, State Campaigns Director

At the start of what promises to be a very political year, and in the midst of difficult debates about budgets and taxes, state legislators are moving forward (or in some cases backward) with legislation affecting youth in contact with the adult criminal justice system. The following is a legislative update of what is happening across the country:

The Women's March is Back: Time to Take Our Power to the Polls

Aprill O. Turner Friday, 19 January 2018 Posted in 2018, Voices

By Aprill O. Turner, Communications Director

On Jan. 21, 2017, the day after the inauguration of President Trump, the Women's March on Washington descended on the nation's capital to protest a new administration many Americans feared threatened their rights and contradicted their basic values.

MLK’s Dream – Half a Century Later, Bending Our Democracy Towards Justice

Marcy Mistrett Friday, 12 January 2018 Posted in 2018, Voices

By Marcy Mistrett, CEO

Fifty years ago, Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s life was tragically taken in Memphis, TN.  As we celebrate Dr. King’s birthday and commit ourselves to engage, give back, and continue the fight for racial and social justice, I am saddened by how much of Dr. King’s dream has gone deferred, especially with regards to our children.  In our criminal justice system, Dr. Kings dream is literally locked down, and has been since his death.  Yet, there are glimmers of hope for reforms that can be expanded upon by ensuring questions about the way we treat children are part of the political platform in 2018 mid-year elections.

Youth Justice in Alabama: Positive Steps

Brian Evans Wednesday, 10 January 2018 Posted in 2018, Campaigns

By Brian Evans, State Campaigns Director

From 2010-2015, an average of 600 children were tried as adults in Alabama each year; most of them were sent to adult court automatically, without any judicial review.  It is well known that the adult system is worse, both for the young people sent there, and because of higher recidivism rates, for the society that sent them there.  In an election year where reactionary, ‘80s-style, “tough on crime” rhetoric is making an unwelcome comeback, it is refreshing to see that Alabama apparently intends to move – albeit slowly – in the “smart on crime” direction.

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