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2020

Black History Month: Legislative Leaders of Youth Justice Reform

By Rachel Marshall, CFYJ Federal Policy Counsel Friday, 14 February 2020 Posted in 2020

In recognition of Black History Month, CFYJ is featuring a month-long series that celebrates advocates, elected officials and spokespeople that are leading the charge to reform how youth are treated in the criminal justice system.

By Rachel Marshall, CFYJ Federal Policy Counsel

Throughout the last decade we have seen incredible progress in overturning laws that funnel youth into the adult criminal justice system and passing laws to reform our country’s approach for handling justice-involved youth. While youth justice advocates have worked tirelessly for these reforms, we couldn’t have done it without the support of key lawmakers and other elected officials.

Celebrating Ten Years of 'Raising the Age' in Connecticut

By Brian Evans, CFYJ State Campaigns Director Monday, 10 February 2020 Posted in 2020

By Brian Evans, CFYJ State Campaigns Director

Ten years ago, Connecticut took a giant step forward and “Raised the Age” of criminal responsibility from 16 to 18 years of age. As one of only three states in the country that still considered all 16 and 17 year olds as adults, no matter how minor the charge, it was a radical notion for the state to make this shift. Passed in 2007 amid much concern and trepidation about its potential impact on juvenile crime and on the state’s budget, the law turned out to be a resounding success.

Black History Month: Leaders of the “Raise the Age” Movement

By Brian Evans, CFYJ State Campaigns Director Saturday, 08 February 2020 Posted in 2020

In recognition of Black History Month, CFYJ is featuring a month-long series that celebrates advocates, elected officials and spokespeople that are leading the charge to reform how youth are treated in the criminal justice system.

By Brian Evans, CFYJ State Campaigns Director

The most successful youth justice movement over the past decade, that has dramatically reduced the numbers of children charged as adults, has been the movement to “Raise the Age”. Prior to 2007, there were 14 states with laws that required all 17-year-olds (and in some cases 16-year-olds) to be charged as adults, regardless of their alleged offense. Now there are just three (Georgia, Texas, and Wisconsin).

Black History Month: Honoring The Voices of Youth Justice

By Aprill O. Turner, CFYJ Communications Director Monday, 03 February 2020 Posted in 2020

In recognition of Black History Month, CFYJ will feature a month-long series that celebrates advocates, elected officials and spokespeople that are leading the charge to reform how youth are treated in the criminal justice system.

By Aprill O. Turner, CFYJ Communications Director 

Black History Month is a time to celebrate and remember all the ways that African Americans have contributed to our history and culture. It is also a time to reflect on the ills that still plague us as a nation -- and to learn from the injustices and adversities the Black community has faced.

OUR BELOVED COMMUNITY

By Marcy Mistrett, CEO Thursday, 16 January 2020 Posted in 2020

Make Martin Luther King Jr. Day, a day on and not off: Support the Justice for Juveniles Act

By Marcy Mistrett, CFYJ CEO

It’s a nice coincidence that the much awaited film based on Bryan Stevenson’s life, Just Mercy, launched just weeks before the country celebrates the birthday of one of our greatest social justice warriors, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., who would have been 91 today had he not been assassinated.

Dr. King upheld the principles of justice, equal opportunity and love in his call for a Beloved Community. He was arrested and jailed 29 times; so was no stranger to the mistreatment inmates received in southern jails, including in Montgomery, AL, the same city where Stevenson’s Equal Justice  Initiative was founded.  He was able to see humanity in his oppressors, and found forgiveness for those who committed harm against him and his family.